Sign in

AR Insider
A publication about spatial computing | Brought to you by ARtillery Intelligence.

One of AR’s core properties is to fuse the physical and digital (a.k.a. phygital). Part of this involves physical places: AR devices have to understand a space before they augment it. This breathes new opportunity into the longstanding location intelligence sector.

For example, Foursquare — the king of location intelligence — has an experimental project to power audio AR experiences. Known as Marsbot for AirPods, it utilizes Foursquare’s signature location data to inform you audibly about local points of interest as you walk by them.

With AR’s more common visual connotations, we likewise see activity such as Google Lens and…


Though we spend ample time examining consumer-based AR endpoints, greater near-term impact is seen today in the enterprise. This takes many forms including camera commerce and collaboration. But the greatest area of enterprise AR impact today is in industrial settings.

This includes AR visualization to support assembly and maintenance. The idea is that AR’s line-of-sight orientation can guide front-line workers. Compared to the “mental mapping” they must do with 2D instructions, line-of-sight support makes them more effective.

This effectiveness results from AR-guided speed, accuracy, and safety. These micro efficiencies add up to worthwhile bottom-line impact when deployed at scale. …


AR’s role in marketing and commerce continues to ratchet up as brands see that it’s working. This plays out through performance and ROI in ad campaigns, as well as signals that AR is gaining traction among consumers as a shopping utility. We call this Camera Commerce.

As we examined recently, the technology is still in early adopter phases but it’s quickly acclimating among mainstream audiences. And like past shopping technologies such as high-end photography, the tipping point will eventually come when it shifts from acclimation to expectation.

As that process unfolds, AR will become table stakes. Then it will begin…


One of the marks of platforms is cultivating developer communities. At a basic level, that’s inherent in a given platform itself, and the tools it offers to enable third-party innovation. But as platforms mature, they do more to actively build community and incentivize creation.

8th Wall crossed one of those milestones last week with the launch of its Partner Program. This is a global directory of agencies and creative studios that are deemed proficient in building AR experiences with 8th Wall. It positions them to brand marketers as recommended shops.

As a corollary to the Partner Program, 8th Wall has…


Though we spend ample time examining consumer-based AR endpoints, greater near-term impact is seen today in the enterprise. This takes many forms including camera commerce and collaboration. But the greatest area of enterprise AR impact today is in industrial settings.

This includes AR visualization to support assembly and maintenance. The idea is that AR’s line-of-sight orientation can guide front-line workers. Compared to the “mental mapping” they must do with 2D instructions, line-of-sight support makes them more effective.

This effectiveness results from AR-guided speed, accuracy, and safety. These micro efficiencies add up to worthwhile bottom-line impact when deployed at scale. …


One of the top targets in the market sizing of our research arm, ARtillery Intelligence, is reliable formula inputs. Half the battle is devising strong bottom-up financial models that reflect the market’s unit economics….and the other half is filling in the blanks.

This process unfolds across subsegments of the spatial spectrum — everything from consumer VR to enterprise AR to camera commerce. But the foundation is often the hardware base: what’s the upper limit of devices on which various flavors of monetization can occur?

In mobile AR for example, an escalating share of devices are AR-compatible as newer hardware phases…


Though AR continues to be challenged in gaining mainstream consumer traction, there are some bright spots to report. Specifically, revenue continues to gain momentum in mobile AR categories like advertising, commerce, and enterprise productivity.

To quantify those markets today and projected forward, ARtillery’s Intelligence’s latest revenue forecast does a deep dive on mobile AR. That includes several subsectors and moving parts such as consumer spending, enterprise spending, enablement software, and AR marketing.

To synthesize and summarize the report’s findings, the latest episode of ARtillery Briefs breaks things down, which you can see below in embedded video and narrative takeaways.

Baseline

So…


Emerging technologies often follow a common evolutionary path from novelty to utility. It’s all about fun & games before settling into lasting value in everyday mundane utilities. Consider the iPhone’s arc from novelty apps like iBeer and Zippo to staples like Uber and Spotify.

The same thing happened on the web. After the early 2000’s bubble burst from an inflated atmosphere of grandiose visions, the web eventually reached those elevated valuations….but in a different form. The web’s killer apps are decidedly mundane: search, email, news and productivity.

Mundane sounds like a bad word, but it’s not. The above killer apps…


Though we spend ample time examining consumer-based AR endpoints, greater near-term impact is seen today in the enterprise. This takes many forms including camera commerce and collaboration. But the greatest area of enterprise AR impact today is in industrial settings.

This includes AR visualization to support assembly and maintenance. The idea is that AR’s line-of-sight orientation can guide front-line workers. Compared to the “mental mapping” they must do with 2D instructions, line-of-sight support makes them more effective.

This effectiveness results from AR-guided speed, accuracy and safety. These micro efficiencies add up to worthwhile bottom-line impact when deployed at scale. …


Of all of the developing AR use cases, customer support is on the under-exposed side of the spectrum. Though not as sexy as AR shopping and gaming, it’s a fitting and monetizable AR format. And as we’ve examined, the future of AR could be all about non-sexy utilities.

Specifically, AR’s use in customer services involves guiding consumers visually through a given support issue. This happens through a user’s upheld smartphone, enabling support reps to see and guide processes like fixing a sink or setting up a wifi router, including visual annotations.

This resonates with users because voice-only support can be…

AR Insider

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store