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AR Insider
A publication about spatial computing | Brought to you by ARtillery Intelligence.

Though we spend ample time examining consumer-based AR applications and strategies, greater near-term impact is seen today in the enterprise. As is the case with many emerging technologies, enterprise AR spending has erstwhile outweighed its consumer equivalent.

So how big is this opportunity and what are best practices for enterprises to implement AR and realize strong ROI? This is the topic of ARtillery Intelligence’s recent report on enterprise AR case studies. It’s also the focus of the latest ARtillery Briefs episode (video and takeaways below).

Mental Mapping

To first define Enterprise AR, it takes many forms including data visualization in corporate settings…


One striking realization about spatial computing is that we’re almost seven years into the sector’s current stage. This traces back to Facebook’s Oculus acquisition in early 2014 that kicked off the current wave of excitement….including lots of ups and downs in the intervening years.

That excitement culminated in 2016 after the Oculus acquisition had time to set off a chain reaction of startup activity, tech-giant investment, and VC inflows for the “next computing platform.” But when technical and practical realities caught up with spatial computing….it began to retract.

Like past tech revolutions — most memorably, the dot com boom/bust —…


One of the biggest news items from the past few weeks in the AR sphere is the U.S. Army’s renewed contract with Microsoft. As we covered recently in Spatial Beats, it’s doubling down on AR, including combat-optimized HoloLens 2 units for battlespace awareness and effectiveness.

But what is the financial impact of this deal? It’s been reported that the price tag is $22 billion, but how does this stack up to current enterprise AR spending? Similarly, how does it amplify the AR market in the aggregate? We’re crunching the numbers for this week’s Data Dive.

First, as background, the deal…


As you likely know, one of AR’s foundational principles is to fuse the digital and physical. The real world is a key part of that formula….and real-world relevance is often defined by location. That same relevance and scarcity are what drive real estate value….location, location, location.

Synthesizing these factors, one of AR’s battlegrounds will be in augmenting the world in location-relevant ways. That could be wayfinding with Google Live View, or visual search with Google Lens. Point your phone (or future glasses) at places and objects to contextualize them.

As you can tell from the above examples, Google will have…


One striking realization about spatial computing is that we’re almost seven years into the sector’s current stage. This traces back to Facebook’s Oculus acquisition in early 2014 that kicked off the current wave of excitement….including lots of ups and downs in the intervening years.

That excitement culminated in 2016 after the Oculus acquisition had time to set off a chain reaction of startup activity, tech-giant investment, and VC inflows for the “next computing platform.” But when technical and practical realities caught up with spatial computing….it began to retract.

Like past tech revolutions — most memorably, the dot com boom/bust —…


One way to cut through the hyperbole and marketing rhetoric of any tech sector is hard numbers. That’s especially true in AR, given some of the overblown expectations set during its circa-2016 hype cycle. It could reach those once-trumpeted heights, but not for several years.

Meanwhile, where are we today? One meter stick or proxy for AR market size is the quantity of AR apps that are downloaded by consumers. Recently in search of this figure, our research arm ARtillery Intelligence reached out to mobile app analytics firm App Annie and got an answer.

The firm reports that .7% (seven-tenths…


After expanding and contracting in various VR initiatives, Google continues to be committed to AR. It sees the technology more aligned with the future of search. If search and AR had a baby, it would be visual search — Google’s prevailing AR play, otherwise known as Google Lens.

As examined in our Location Wars series, this also takes form in what we call Google’s Internet of Places. This involves indexing the physical world in ways that are analogous to the ways that it built up tremendous value by indexing the web. This is Google’s version of an AR cloud.

All…


One striking realization about spatial computing is that we’re almost seven years into the sector’s current stage. This traces back to Facebook’s Oculus acquisition in early 2014 that kicked off the current wave of excitement….including lots of ups and downs in the intervening years.

That excitement culminated in 2016 after the Oculus acquisition had time to set off a chain reaction of startup activity, tech-giant investment, and VC inflows for the “next computing platform.” But when technical and practical realities caught up with spatial computing….it began to retract.

Like past tech revolutions — most memorably, the dot com boom/bust —…


One prevailing misperception in the tech world is that VR is in the gutter. Some have even pronounced it dead. Such sentiments reflect the backlash to VR’s circa-2016 hype cycle. It didn’t fulfill world-changing proclamations trumpeted at the time… and deserves some grief.

But practically speaking, VR is doing just fine and is growing at a healthy pace for an emerging technology that faces practicality headwinds. In fact, signals tracked by our research arm ARtillery Intelligence, indicate VR is on an upswing after declining about 10 percent in 2020.

That decline was Covid-inflected, given supply-chain impediments. But demand remained strong…


As you likely know, one of AR’s foundational principles is to fuse the digital and physical. The real world is a key part of that formula… and real-world relevance is often defined by location. That same relevance and scarcity are what drive real estate value….location, location, location.

Synthesizing these factors, one of AR’s battlegrounds will be in augmenting the world in location-relevant ways. That could be wayfinding with Google Live View, or visual search with Google Lens. Point your phone (or future glasses) at places and objects to contextualize them.

As you can tell from the above examples, Google will…

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